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Shock Waves pp 831-836 | Cite as

Transition between detonation and deflagration in a tube with a cavity

  • Z. M. Hu
  • C. L. Liu
  • D. L. Zhang
  • Z. Jiang
Conference paper

Abstract

In this paper, the transition of a detonation from deflagration was investigated numerically while a detonation wave propagates in a tube with a sudden change in cross section, referred to as the expansion cavity. The dispersion-controlled scheme was adopted to solve Euler equations of axis-symmetric flows implemented with detailed chemical reaction kinetics of hydrogen-oxygen (or hydrogen-air) mixture. The fractional step method was applied to treat the stiff problems of chemical reaction flow. It is observed that phenomena of detonation quenching and reigniting appear when the planar detonation front diffracts at the vertex of the expansion cavity entrance. Numerical results show that detonation front in mixture of higher sensitivity keeps its substantial coupled structure when it propagates into the expansion cavity. However, the leading shock wave decouples with the combustion zone if mixture of lower sensitivity was set as the initial gas.

Keywords

Detonation Wave Combustion Zone Detonation Front Mach Stem Mach Reflection 
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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. M. Hu
    • 1
  • C. L. Liu
    • 1
  • D. L. Zhang
    • 1
  • Z. Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of MechanicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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