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Emotion: Theoretical Investigations and Implications for Artificial Social Aggregates

  • Christian von Scheve
  • Daniel Moldt
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2934)

Abstract

One of the most pressing issues in the social sciences and in distributed artificial intelligence research is the micro-macro link that is the question of how individual action and social structure are interrelated. Besides others disciplines, sociological research has identified emotion as being a possible key component in this link. Unfortunately, sociological theories in question remain relatively basic, and do not refer to emotion research from other disciplines. We show that emotion theories and models from cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, and computer science constitute a valuable, if not mandatory foundation for sociological issues in emotion research. We therefore present an integrated view on emotion. The goal is to relate specific micro-macro aspects of emotion theory with general sociological theories of societal structuration. This issue is briefly discussed in the context of an exemplifying multi-agent architecture.

Keywords

Social Cognition Cognitive Activity Sociological Theory Appraisal Process Emotion Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian von Scheve
    • 1
  • Daniel Moldt
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of SociologyUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany

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