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Cross-Strait Relations from a Linguistic Perspective

  • Lutgard Lams

Abstract

From a social-constructivist vantage point, it is often argued that language is particularly powerful in (re)constructing existing perceptions and interpretations of social and political processes and phenomena. Following this epistemological line, this chapter aims to examine the ideological implications of linguistic strategies in discourses on the cross-Strait issue. It first investigates complexities involved in referring to these issues, especially via a detour of the English language used by the Chinese and Taiwanese communities to present particular perspectives to the foreign world. These discursive constructions are of crucial importance for image-building abroad and, consequently, political action. For this reason, the second half of this chapter presents examples of linguistic choices found in official EU documents. It is not a discursive study of the EU discourse on the cross-Strait issue per se, since this topic is the subject of a larger project which maps European discursive perspectives on Taiwan as presented at the 2007 Asia Pacific Round Table Forum in Brussels (Lams and Liao 2007) and further elaborated in Lams and Liao (2008).

Keywords

European Parliament Asian Development Bank Lexical Variant Taiwan Strait Linguistic Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lutgard Lams

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