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Autoethnografie

  • Carolyn Ellis
  • Tony E. Adams
  • Arthur P. Bochner

Zusammenfassung

Autoethnografie ist ein Forschungsansatz, der sich darum bemüht, persönliche Erfahrung (auto) zu beschreiben und systematisch zu analysieren (grafie), um kulturelle Erfahrung (ethno) zu verstehen (Ellis 2004; Holman Jones 2005). Er stellt kanonische Gepflogenheiten, Forschung zu betreiben und zu präsentieren, infrage (Spry 2001) und behandelt Forschung als einen politischen und sozialen Akt (Adams & Holman Jones 2008). Forschende nutzen Grundsätze der Autobiografie und Ethnografie, um Autoethnografie zu betreiben und zu schreiben. Daher bezeichnet Autoethnografie sowohl eine Methode/einen Prozess als auch ein Produkt.

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Weiterführende Literatur

  1. Ellis, Carolyn (2004). The ethnographic I: A methodological novel about autoethnography. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
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  3. Reed-Danahay, Deborah E. (Hrsg.) (1997). Auto/Ethnography: Rewriting the self and the social. Oxford: Berg.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolyn Ellis
  • Tony E. Adams
  • Arthur P. Bochner

There are no affiliations available

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