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Philosophical Animal Encounters with Cynical Affinities: Variants in Diogenes and Schopenhauer (with Remarks on Montaigne, Derrida, Blumenberg)

  • D. S. MayfieldEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cultural Animal Studies book series (CAS, volume 4)

Abstract

Philosophy is thought to have commenced with detached wonderment—Animal Studies with an immediate encounter (whether in Derrida or Montaigne). Yet a comparably inductive approach to animals had already initiated Diogenical Cynicism, subtending any discourse with such affinities. Not incidentally, the Ancient variant—deriving its designation from the Greek word for ‘dog’—is likely the most prominent philosophical ‘interest group’ bearing an animal in its very label; and cynical discourses dependably share a down-to-earth, animal-related approach diachronically. Like the inaugurative impact of Diogenes, Schopenhauer’s (and Blumenberg’s) place in a theriophilic ‘genealogy’ is to be maintained.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BerlinGermany

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