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Power and Identity

  • Sandy Lazarus
Chapter
Part of the Community Psychology book series (COMPSY)

Abstract

In this chapter, I engage with issues of power and identity and explore empowerment as a strategy for transformation in contexts of oppression, privilege and inequality. A central focus for this chapter is a critical self-reflection or reflexivity on the development of my identity and social position as a white, professional, middle-class woman in power relations and how this has impacted on my community practice in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa.

Keywords

Power Identity Oppression Privilege Inequality South Africa Apartheid Post-apartheid Reflexivity Empowerment Community psychology practice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandy Lazarus
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Social and Health SciencesUniversity of South Africa (Unisa)PretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)-Unisa ViolenceInjury and Peace Research UnitCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationUniversity of the Western CapeCape TownSouth Africa

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