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Osteopathic Treatment for Cancer-Related Pain

  • Ryan K. Murphy
  • Jonas M. Sokolof
Chapter

Abstract

Pain in the cancer patient is often multifactorial related to disease burden, chemotherapy, radiation, and other treatments. Osteopathic manipulation therapy (OMT) may be used to provide effective and conservative therapy for complications or dysfunction due to medical and surgical treatment of the cancer patient. Examples of diagnoses to utilize OMT include scar tissue, radiation-induced fibrosis, trismus, axial spine pain, and many others.

Keywords

OMT OMM Cancer Back pain Rehabilitation Postmastectomy syndrome Radiation fibrosis Cervicalgia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Valley Medical GroupWaldwickUSA
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitative MedicineWeill College of Medicine Cornell UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Neurology – Rehabilitation ServicesMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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