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Values and Decision-Making

  • Claretha Hughes
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the importance of organizational values established through norms and how those values influence ethical or unethical decision-making in the workplace. Leader behavior is the number one influencer of employee behavior in the workplace. Ethics can be developed through education and training. Human resource development (HRD) scholars and professionals must provide the appropriate ethics education and training needed by workplace leaders. Historical views, principles, and theories of ethics are also discussed. The establishment of codes of ethics and communicating their importance to all employees are reviewed. Understanding the importance of holding employees accountable for their ethical or unethical behavior is also examined. HRD scholars and professionals must show that they are credible providers of ethical education and training by behaving ethically in the workplace.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Claretha Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Arkansas at FayettevilleFayettevilleUSA

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