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Toward a More Specific and Collaborative Understanding of Ethical and Legal Issues in HRD

  • Claretha Hughes
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides human resource development (HRD) scholars and professionals with statutes and regulations that affect HRD scholarship and practice. The most important skills and competencies for HRD scholars and professionals to manage legal regulations and standards effectively are administration, treatment of participants, business skills, global mindset, industry knowledge, interpersonal skills, integrated talent management, and change management. These skills and competencies directly influence how HRD professionals interact and collaborate with others to improve employee behavior on the job. Technology skills may supplement these skills and competencies, but people-to-people interactions are essential for improved legal and ethical decision-making. HRD professionals must possess these skills and competencies to develop effective ethical and legal training programs and resources to ensure the economic success of organizations. HRD professionals can help to reduce problems and liability risks for their organization by helping all employees understand how important it is to treat each other fairly on the job. HRD scholars and professionals can design education and training using proven strategies to increase employee effectiveness in making ethical decisions and understanding legal statutes. HRD professionals must also understand economics and its role in the success of the organization. Exploring how to help organizations integrate Gig economy workers into the workforce is also a role of HRD professionals and scholars.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claretha Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Arkansas at FayettevilleFayettevilleUSA

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