Advertisement

Introduction to Geology, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea

  • Najeeb M. A. Rasul
  • Ian C. F. Stewart
  • Geoff N. Bailey
  • Zohair A. Nawab
Chapter

Introduction

The present volume follows on from an earlier work edited by Rasul and Stewart (2015), in which an extensive introduction (Rasul et al. 2015) outlined the main features of the Red Sea, including an overview of the regional tectonics, geology and geophysics, oceanography and biology. Only one chapter in that volume referred to archaeology, and summarized knowledge then existing about the general Stone Age record with particular emphasis on the role of the Red Sea as a corridor for the earliest expansion of human populations out of Africa during the Pleistocene and the impact of Pleistocene sea-level and climate change on patterns of occupation in the Arabian Peninsula (Bailey 2015). Since that chapter was written, there has been a considerable expansion of archaeological research in Saudi Arabia involving joint Saudi-international teams under the sponsorship of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, along with ongoing geological investigations under the...

References

  1. Augustin N, Devey CW, van der Zwan FM, Feldens P, Tominaga M, Bantan RA, Kwasnitschka T (2014) The rifting to spreading transition in the Red Sea. Earth Planet Sci Lett 395:217–230.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2014.03.047CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bailey GN (2015) The evolution of the red sea as a human habitat during the quaternary period. In: Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) The Red Sea: The formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 595–610.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_34Google Scholar
  3. Ben-Avraham Z, Garfunkel Z, Lazar M (2008) Geology and evolution of the southern Dead Sea Fault with emphasis on subsurface structure. Ann Rev Earth Planet Sci 36:357–387CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Biton E, Gildor H, Peltier WR (2008) Red Sea during the last glacial maximum: implications for sea level reconstruction. Paleooceanography 23, PA1214.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2007pa001431CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bonatti E, Cipriani A, Lupi L (2015) The Red Sea: birth of an ocean. In: Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) the Red Sea: the formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 29–44.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_2Google Scholar
  6. Bosworth W (1995) A high-strain rift model for the southern Gulf of Suez (Egypt). Geol Soc London, Spec Publ 80:75–102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bosworth W (2015) Geological evolution of the Red Sea: Historical background, review, and synthesis. In: Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) The Red Sea: the formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 45–78.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_3Google Scholar
  8. Daradich A, Mitrovica JX, Pysklywec RN, Willett SD, Forte AM (2003) Mantle flow, dynamic topography, and rift-flank uplift of Arabia. Geology 31:901–904CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Head SM (1987) Red Sea fisheries. In: Edwards AJ, Head SM (eds) Red Sea: Key Environments. Pergamon Press, Oxford, pp 363–382CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hovland M, Rueslåtten H, Johnsen HK (2015) Red Sea salt formations—a result of hydrothermal processes. In: Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) The Red Sea: the formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 187–203.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_11Google Scholar
  11. Lambeck K, Purcell A, Flemming NC, Vita-Finzi C, Alsharekh AM, Bailey GN (2011) Sea level and shoreline reconstructions for the Red Sea: isostatic and tectonic considerations and implications for hominin migration out of Africa. Quatern Sci Rev 30:3542–3574CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Morcos SA (1970) Physical and chemical oceanography of the Red Sea. Oceanogr Mar Biol Ann Rev 8:73–202Google Scholar
  13. Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) (2015) The Red Sea: The formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, 633 pp, ISBN 978-3-662-45200-4, ISBN 978-3-662-45201-1 (eBook).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_1Google Scholar
  14. Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF, Nawab ZA (2015) Introduction to the Red Sea: its origin, structure and environment. In: Rasul NMA, Stewart ICF (eds) The Red Sea: the formation, morphology, oceanography and environment of a young ocean basin. Springer Earth System Sciences, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1–28.  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-45201-1_1Google Scholar
  15. Stern RJ, Johnson PR (2010) Continental lithosphere of the Arabian Plate: A geologic, petrologic, and geophysical synthesis. Earth-Sci Rev 101:29–67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Trommer G, Siccha M, Rohling EJ, Grant K, van der Meer MTJ, Schouten S, Baranowski U, Kucera M (2011) Sensitivity of Red Sea circulation to sea level and insolation forcing during the last interglacial. Climate of the Past 7:941–955.  https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-7-941-2011CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Najeeb M. A. Rasul
    • 1
  • Ian C. F. Stewart
    • 2
  • Geoff N. Bailey
    • 3
    • 4
  • Zohair A. Nawab
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for Marine Geology, Saudi Geological SurveyJeddahSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Stewart Geophysical Consultants Pty. LtdAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of YorkYorkUK
  4. 4.College of Humanities, Arts and Social SciencesFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia
  5. 5.Saudi Geological SurveyJeddahSaudi Arabia

Personalised recommendations