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Pain pp 1087-1092 | Cite as

Complementary and Alternative Medicine

  • Deepti AgarwalEmail author
  • Maunak V. Rana
Chapter

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine in western medicine has had a more prominent role over the past few years, especially in multidisciplinary pain management. Of the physical modalities helpful in the concurrent management of pain, yoga and mindfulness meditation have emerged as effective options, and literature has identified acupuncture as efficacious and safe. Nutraceuticals have a role in the management of pain, but mechanisms of action need to be elucidated and regulatory bodies need to ensure quality control and dosage safety.

Keywords

Complementary medicine Acupuncture CAM Yoga Reiki Tai Chi Reflexology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity of Illinois Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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