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Impact of Climate Change on Coastal Agro-Ecosystems

  • Saon Banerjee
  • Suman Samanta
  • Pramiti Kumar Chakraborti
Chapter
Part of the Sustainable Agriculture Reviews book series (SARV, volume 33)

Abstract

Climate change is a major threat for ecosystems, food security, forests and other natural resources. Proper steps must be taken to reduce the vulnerability of the farming communities living in coastal areas, especially in the developing countries. This chapter reviews the impact of climate change on the coastal agro-ecosystem, and practices to improve sustainability. We found that 27 countries are the most vulnerable due to accelerated sea level rise. In some coastal areas, up to 40% biodiversity loss has already been observed. About 70% income is generated from crop cultivation and the rest is from fisheries and other animal husbandry activities. Hence, climate resilient agriculture can secure the rural livelihood. Adaptation measures may include agro-forestry practices, establishment of orchards, nutrient recycling, salinity management and rational use of water. Techniques of climate resilient agriculture vary with techniques available, needs of the farming community, resources and infrastructure.

Keywords

Coastal ecosystem Climate resilient agriculture Climate change Sea level rise Cyclone 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The help and encouragement of Director of Research and Honorable Vice Chancellor, BCKV are duly acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saon Banerjee
    • 1
  • Suman Samanta
    • 2
  • Pramiti Kumar Chakraborti
    • 3
  1. 1.AICRP on Agrometeorology, Directorate of ResearchBidhan Chandra KrishiViswavidyalayaKalyaniIndia
  2. 2.Department of Environmental StudiesVisva-BharatiSantiniketanIndia
  3. 3.AICRPAM-NICRA Project, Directorate of ResearchBidhan Chandra KrishiViswavidyalayaKalyaniIndia

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