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Non-Noble Metal as Catalysts for Alcohol Electro-oxidation Reaction

  • Samuel Dessources
  • Diego Xavier del Jesús González-Quijano
  • Wilian Jesús Pech-Rodríguez
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the use of non-noble metals as catalysts in DAFCs, and their catalytic activity and stability with different liquid fuels in acid and alkaline media. Section “Methanol Oxidation Reaction (MOR) on Nickel-Based Anodes” of the chapter aims to describe the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on non-noble metal catalysts containing Ni, Sn, Co, and Cu. In addition, the effect of the methanol concentration for this reaction and that of the method of synthesis on these catalysts is revised. In section “Ethanol Oxidation Reaction (EOR) on Non-noble Metals”, the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is studied for anodes based on Ni, Ir, and Co. Also, a new non-noble catalyst called HYPERMEC is reported for the EOR. This catalyst has shown a better oxidation reaction activity, which is carried out without the formation of acetate. It also shows higher tolerance to the CO poisoning than Pt-based catalysts. Furthermore, the ethylene glycol oxidation reaction (EGOR) in alkaline media for this catalyst is reported and summarized in section “Ethylene Glycol Oxidation (EGOR) in Alkaline Media” of this chapter. This information will be helpful in providing the catalytic activity reported to date of these non-noble metal catalysts, and to understand their catalytic behavior.

Keywords

Non-noble catalysts Ethylene glycol Ethanol Solid alkaline fuel cells PEMFC Nickel-base anodes Cobalt-base anodes Iridium-base anodes HYPERMEC Alkaline media Acid media MOR EOR EGOR DAFC DMFC Synthesis Alloy Plurimetalic Core-shell 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Dessources
    • 1
  • Diego Xavier del Jesús González-Quijano
    • 2
  • Wilian Jesús Pech-Rodríguez
    • 3
  1. 1.Sustentabilidad de los Recursos Naturales y Energía, Cinvestav Unidad Saltillo, Parque Industrial Ramos ArizpeRamos ArizpeMexico
  2. 2.Departamento de Ingeniería Biomédica, Centro de Ciencias de la IngenieríaUniversidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes Campus Sur, AguascalientesAguascalientesMexico
  3. 3.Universidad Politécnica de Victoria, Parque Científico y Tecnológico de TamaulipasCiudad VictoriaMexico

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