Advertisement

Objectivity and Subjectivity in Hegel and McDowell

  • Michela Bordignon
Chapter
Part of the Studies in German Idealism book series (SIGI, volume 20)

Abstract

In this paper I will analyse the relation between subjectivity and objectivity in McDowell’s and Hegel’s philosophical approaches. I will focus on McDowell’s critical investigation of the Myth of the Given and of Davidson’s coherentism and on Hegel’s critical analysis of the second position of thought towards objectivity. I will show that Hegel and McDowell share the same strategy for solving the problems of two opposite philosophical positions, but I will also underline that they develop this strategy in two different directions. I will proceed as follows: (i) I will trace back McDowell’s criticism of the Myth of the Given to Hegel’s critical analysis of empiricism; (ii) I will trace back McDowell’s criticism of coherentism to Hegel’s critical analysis of Kantian criticism; (iii) I will show that Hegel and McDowell agree on the diagnosis of the anxieties affecting modern thought, that are rooted in a subjective, formal and thus finite conception of thought determinations. I will show that both Hegel’s and McDowell’s cure for the modern philosophical anxieties consists in the revision of the presupposition of the dualism affecting modern thought. In this part of the article I will investigate some correspondences between Hegel’s and McDowell’s theories, but I will also show that McDowell’s idea of the unboundedness of the conceptual cannot be fully assimilated to Hegel’s idea of objective thought.

References

  1. Asmuth, Christoph. 2010. Der Empirismus und die kritische Philosophie Kants. Zur zweiten »Stellung des Gedankens zur Objektivität« im enzyklopädischen »Vorbegriff« der spekulativen Logik. In Der »Vorbegriff« zur Wissenschaft der Logik in der Enzyklopädie von 1830, ed. A. Denker, A. Sell, and H. Zaborowski, 144–145. Freiburg/München: Verlag Karl Alber.Google Scholar
  2. Bowie, Andrew. 1996. John McDowell’s Mind and World, and Early Romantic Epistemology. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 197: 515–554.Google Scholar
  3. Halbig, Christoph. 2002. Objektives Denken Erkenntnistheorie und Philosophy of Mind in Hegels System. Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog.Google Scholar
  4. Quante, Michael. 2002. Reconciling Mind and World: Some Initial Considerations for Opening a Dialogue between Hegel and McDowell. The Southern Journal of Philosophy 40: 75–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. ———. 2011. Die Wirklichkeit des Geistes. Studien zu Hegel. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  6. Redding, Paul. 2011. The Analytic Neo-Hegelianism of John McDowell and Robert Brandom. In A Companion to Hegel, ed. S. Houlgate and M. Baur, 576–593. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Rockmore, Tom. 2005. Hegel, Idealism, and Analytic Philosophy. New Haven/London: Yale University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Sandkaulen, Birgit. 2010. Dritte Stellung des Gedankens zur Objektivität. Das unmittelbare Wissen. In Der »Vorbegriff« zur Wissenschaft der Logik in der Enzyklopädie von 1830, ed. A. Denker, A. Sell, and H. Zaborowski, 166–191. Freiburg/München: Verlag Karl Alber.Google Scholar
  9. Sanguinetti, Federico. 2015b. La teoria hegeliana della sensazione. Trento: Verifiche.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michela Bordignon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, Universidade Federal do ABCSão Bernardo do CampoBrazil

Personalised recommendations