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Starting the Journey: Introducing the Study, Youth, and Their Stories

  • Amanda K. Kibler
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to Longitudinal Interactional Histories: Bilingual and Biliterate Journeys of Mexican Immigrant-Origin Youth, a book that aims to provide insight into patterns of language and literacy development as they occur in and across multiple and diverse settings during linguistically minoritized youth’s adolescence and young adulthood. A rationale for the study is presented, alongside details of the particular sociohistorical, cultural, and linguistic contexts in which the study took place. Researcher positioning is also discussed, before turning to introductions of the five youth whose stories are presented in the book: Jaime, Ana, Diego, Fabiola, and Maria. The chapter closes with an overview of the organization of the book.

Keywords

Language Literacy Bilingual Biliterate Mexican-origin Youth Minoritized Longitudinal English learner 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda K. Kibler
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EducationOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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