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The Policy-Making of the European Union Global Strategy (2016)

  • Pol Morillas
Chapter
Part of the The European Union in International Affairs book series (EUIA)

Abstract

This chapter examines the policy-making process of the EUGS as an illustration of the inter-institutional dynamics of external action. It argues that the HR/VP benefited from having the right of initiative when deciding on the range of policies covered by the EUGS and the shape of its policy formulation process. Strategy-making has provided for the emergence of autonomy in intergovernmentalism, whereby the HR/VP and the EEAS have become central players in an area traditionally ruled by intergovernmental practices. The focus on the operationalisation of the EUGS has also enabled the EU to make progress in several areas of implementation, particularly security and defence. The EUGS has become the vehicle through which current developments circulate and has facilitated the parallel convergence of policy initiatives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Barcelona Centre for International Affairs (CIDOB)BarcelonaSpain

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