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The Washback Effect of the Thanaweya Amma English Test: Drawbacks and Solutions

  • Mahmoud Ibrahim
Chapter

Abstract

The Thanaweya Amma (the Egyptian high school summative assessment) English language test has an immense washback effect. The current study is aimed at investigating this effect both on the students’ learning habits inside and outside the classroom and on the teachers’ teaching practices. To this end, structured interviews were conducted with 78 Thanaweya Amma students and 43 high school English language teachers. Findings confirm that one of the washback effects of the test is relying on the grammar translation method for teaching and learning as well as targeting to achieve declarative knowledge at the expense of procedural knowledge. The study concludes with feasible recommendations to increase the validity of the test to change the direction of the washback effect from negative into positive.

Keywords

Washback effect Thanaweya Amma English test Grammar translation method Declarative knowledge Procedural knowledge 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahmoud Ibrahim
    • 1
  1. 1.English Language InstituteUniversity of JeddahJeddahSaudi Arabia

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