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Demand Response Management in Smart Buildings

  • Donato Zarrilli
Chapter
Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses)

Abstract

In this chapter an optimization approach based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) for allowing the temperature control system of large buildings to participate in a DR program is proposed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Scienze MatematicheUniversità di SienaSienaItaly

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