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Dealing with the Past

  • Sarah E. Jankowitz
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Compromise after Conflict book series (PSCAC)

Abstract

Peacebuilding, reconciliation, and transitional justice mechanisms are oriented around a broad imperative to acknowledge victims and hold wrongdoers accountable, and this chapter underlines key tensions that arise in these processes. Acknowledgement and accountability are crucial for both victims and wider society, and in particular to creating conditions in which relationships between former adversaries may be built upon a foundation of social trust and mutual accountability. The provision of ‘truth’ about past injustices in these efforts raises dilemmas regarding the multiple truths that persist, whose truth becomes part of the ‘official’ record as well as the personal and social ramifications of discovering uncomfortable truths. In order to address these tensions, I urge a more complex view of conflict and its actors in responses to the individual and societal legacies of violence.

Keywords

Peacebuilding Reconciliation Transitional justice Truth Victims 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah E. Jankowitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Irish StudiesUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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