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Caesar: The Rise and Dawn of a Humanimalistic Identity

  • Daniel Wolf
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature book series (PSAAL)

Abstract

The Planet of the Apes—created by Pierre Boulle in 1963—is a fictional world in which apes are the dominant species while humans have taken their place in the wild. The screen adaptions in 2011 and 2014 tell the story of the genesis of this world, tightly bound up with the biography of Caesar, an ape who not only learns to talk but establishes a humanlike society of apes. With an animal as the protagonist, there seems to be a nonhuman focus. Nevertheless, Caesar cannot really be categorized as an animal, due to his socialization and artificially enhanced cognitive skills. The article introduces Caesars biography as a struggle with his identity to analyse the human-animal relations represented by these movies.

Keywords

Anthropomorphism Humanimal Cinema Identity Planet of the Apes Posthuman 

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Media

  1. Rise of the Planet of the Apes, directed by Rupert Wyatt. © 20th Century Fox, 2011.Google Scholar
  2. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, directed by Matt Reeves. © 20th Century Fox, 2014.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KasselKasselGermany

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