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Principles of Validity

  • James R. KorndorfferJr.Email author
Chapter
Part of the Comprehensive Healthcare Simulation book series (CHS)

Abstract

The use of validation and validity when ascribed to simulation and simulators has been poorly understood. Simulation educators continue to utilize older concepts of validity and validation, outdated for over 30 years. In the opinion of this author, this should be as concerning as using outdated medical therapy shown to be less effective than more modern treatments. The concept of validity is now widely considered as unitary, and validation is not a yes or no answer but rather a hypothesis-driven accumulation of evidence. This chapter will discuss the development of the unitary theory of validity, the key tenants of this theory, and the types of evidence needed to support the validation claim based on the intended use of the results.

Keywords

Validity Simulation Theory of validity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vice Chair of Education, Department of SurgeryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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