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Poverty, Terrorism and National Security in the UK’s Development Policy

  • Eamonn McConnon
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking International Development series book series (RID)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the merging of security and development in UK policy, drawing on content and discourse analyses of key UK policy documents 1997–2016 and interviews with key informants. It argues that the DfID has brought UK national security into the core of its policy through a gradual process over this period by linking poverty and instability in the developing world to risks to UK national security such as terrorism and religious extremism. DfID has justified this shift through claims of common interest between development for people in the Global South and security for the UK by drawing on the broader concept of security for individuals in developing countries, wherein development is offered as a means of managing national security risks.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eamonn McConnon
    • 1
  1. 1.The School of Law and GovernmentDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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