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Postcolonial Philosophers

  • Gemma K. Bird
Chapter
Part of the International Political Theory book series (IPoT)

Abstract

The third of the analytical chapters within this book, Chap. 6, moves the timeline forward to focus on the writings of contemporary African philosophers, their writings coming from a range of philosophical and ideological positions. In engaging with these contemporary scholars the chapter asks not whether they work from a Kantian perspective, but rather whether underpinning the work of a diverse range of scholars it is possible to recognise a foundational belief in internal and external self-law giving. To engage with these questions the chapter engages with, amongst others, the work of Kwame Gyekye, Kwasi Wiredu, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Ngũgı Wa Thiong’o and Achille Mbembe.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gemma K. Bird
    • 1
  1. 1.PoliticsUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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