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Between Nationalist Absorption and Subsumption: Reflecting on the Armenian Cypriot Experience

  • Sossie Kasbarian
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter contextualizes the Armenian community in Cyprus amid the various tensions and visions of the Cypriot nation as espoused by different state, community and regional actors. It seeks to address how the community has been politically co-opted into Greek Cypriot nationalism, while exercising a significant degree of autonomy in cultural and social matters. It makes the argument that the Armenians in Cyprus have been absorbed by the Greek Cypriot nation politically speaking, in that their difference in experience and particularities are glossed over or ignored, absorbed into the Greek Cypriot nationalisms. In contrast, socially and culturally, the Armenian community in Cyprus has been successful in maintaining and negotiating a distinct identity in Cyprus, subsumed under a more inclusive multi-cultural vision of the nation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sossie Kasbarian
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of History and PoliticsUniversity of StirlingStirlingUK

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