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Transporting PCIT Around the World

  • Mariëlle Abrahamse
  • Ryan Egan
  • Frederique Coelman
  • Willemine Heiner
Chapter

Abstract

Pathogenic parenting and childhood conduct problems are an international concern; thus, a need exists for evidence-based parenting interventions around the globe. In part because of the large treatment effects associated with parent–child interaction therapy, the model has been transported to many countries outside of the United States (e.g., Australia, Germany, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway). Through its inherent flexibility, PCIT may be an intervention of choice because of its sensitivity and responsiveness to cultural variations in child-rearing that can be readily implemented in international samples. In this chapter, we review the characteristics and results of international effectiveness research on PCIT and provide a case example of the dissemination of PCIT in the Netherlands.

Keywords

PCIT International dissemination Transportability Effectiveness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariëlle Abrahamse
    • 1
  • Ryan Egan
    • 2
  • Frederique Coelman
    • 3
  • Willemine Heiner
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Academic Medical CenterUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of Oklahoma Health Sciences CenterOklahoma CityUSA
  3. 3.De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and Adolescent PsychiatryAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Clinical psychologist in private practiceAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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