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Epidemiologic Characterization of Risk for Cardiovascular Diseases

  • Kevin C. Maki
  • Mary R. Dicklin
  • Kristin M. Nieman
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Over 80 million people in the United States exhibit one or more forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and atherosclerotic CVD (mainly coronary heart disease and stroke) is, by far, the leading cause of death among men and women. In 2013, for the first time since 1983, more men died from CVD in the United States than women. However, more women than men continue to die of stroke each year (58% of all stroke deaths in the United States). Atherosclerotic CVD has become a worldwide pandemic. While CVD mortality has declined over the last several decades in developed countries, incidence and prevalence of atherosclerotic CVD are increasing in the developing world. Risk factors, many of which are modifiable, account for a large percentage of increased CVD risk.

Keywords

Cardiovascular disease Causation Cohort Incidence Relative risk Risk factor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin C. Maki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary R. Dicklin
    • 1
  • Kristin M. Nieman
    • 1
  1. 1.Midwest Biomedical Research/Center for Metabolic and Cardiovascular HealthGlen EllynUSA
  2. 2.DePaul UniversityChicagoUSA

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