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Characteristics of the Provocative Motion Stimuli

  • Thomas G. DobieEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Naval Architecture, Marine Engineering, Shipbuilding and Shipping book series (NAMESS, volume 6)

Abstract

A considerable amount of work has been performed in an attempt to identify the characteristics of motion that provoke motion sickness. As you will see, this has ranged from studies in the laboratory to others that have taken place in environments more akin to the real world. Apart from giving us a better understanding of the mechanism of motion sickness, these data provide valuable design criteria to reduce provocative vehicular responses; in addition, however, we must not forget the operator’s personality and cognition. This is an example of the value of recognising the need to design with the human operator or traveller in mind from day one.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Biodynamics Laboratory, College of EngineeringUniversity of New OrleansNew OrleansUSA

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