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Cognitive-Behavioural Desensitisation Training—The Principles of My Original Programme Using a Rotating/Tilting Chair

  • Thomas G. DobieEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Naval Architecture, Marine Engineering, Shipbuilding and Shipping book series (NAMESS, volume 6)

Abstract

When I devised the cognitive-behavioural desensitisation training programme some years ago, it was and still is based on the concept that chronic motion sickness could well have both physiological and psychological features. My earlier dismal experience with trying to identify successful predictors left me with the feeling that in any given person, I was unable to decide whether his or her problem with motion sickness was more physiological or more psychological. For those reasons, I avoided the issue by planning to cater for both of these characteristics in parallel, on the basis that each individual would get whatever quantum of each type of help that was needed. I am bound to say that in retrospect, I could often have made the correct judgment about the likelihood of success after the training was completed. Does that really matter, however? I think not. You will make your own decision on that point.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Biodynamics Laboratory, College of EngineeringUniversity of New OrleansNew OrleansUSA

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