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Exploring the Legal Color of Secession

Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter the legal color of secession is explored according to Article 38(1) of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, so international conventions, international custom, the general principles of law recognized by civilized nations, and subsidiary means for the determination of rules of law including judicial decisions and the teachings of the most highly qualified publicists of the various nations are taken into consideration. Through this thorough exploration of international legal sources, it is revealed that lex generalis, such as international legal principles, is not in a position to offer a satisfactory solution to secessionist conflicts: the high degree of ambiguity embodied in legal principles invariably leaves them open to numerous and contradicting interpretations. A satisfactory solution to secessionist conflicts is much more concerned with lex specialis, namely an agreement between conflicting parties. In order to formulate such an agreement, the influence of state recognition cannot be ignored: premature recognition disturbs the formulation of an agreement between the conflicting parties and thus negatively affects the solution. Since another major obstacle to the formulation of an agreement between conflicting parties is the divergence of opinion between opponents and proponents of remedial secession, it is meaningful to consider moderating the disagreement between them by replacing a remedial right to secession with a right to a remedy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Lu
    • 1
  1. 1.School of LawSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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