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Horror and Damnation in Medieval Literature

  • Andrew J. Power
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores some of the more horrific tales that can be found in medieval literature. Focussing in on the horror of damnation, it surveys a range of modes and genres from the period, including biblical pageants, saints’ lives, exemplary tales, and romances. The didactic purpose of the more horrific tales of tyranny, torture, and damnation that are highlighted in the chapter is to illustrate and expound the sins of those who have been damned and illuminate the fates of the sinners, damned to an eternal suffering in Hell. However, the lurid detail with which the tales are related and the gory ingenuity with which the sinners are described as being taken to their fates have much in common with several modern horror movies.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Power
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SharjahSharjahUAE

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