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Human Security in Practice: The Philippine Experience from the Perspective of Different Stakeholders

  • Maria Ela L. Atienza
Chapter
Part of the Security, Development and Human Rights in East Asia book series (SDHRP)

Abstract

This chapter explores the way human security is viewed in the Philippines. Based on comprehensive review of literature, key informant interviews, and focus groups, the author maps out perspectives and interpretations of human security among key stakeholders in the Philippines. They acknowledge the importance of the human security concept in dealing with various threats; civil society organizations and universities have already incorporated the human security approach into their advocacy, curricula, and programs, though the concept itself has not been extensively discussed since the enactment of the controversial Human Security Act of 2007. It is suggested that the concept needs further clarification and contextualization in light of local cultural settings and people’s day-to-day experiences. Elaboration on human dignity may take the human security discourse to a higher level.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author acknowledges the help of Assistant Professor Reynold Agnes and Assistant Professor Jan Robert Go for conducting and documenting the 2014 focus group discussions; ISDS for administrative support; and Professor Emeritus Carolina G. Hernandez for her unwavering support.

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Focus Group Discussions (FGDs)

  1. FDG #1. 2014. Barangay Officials, Barangay 395, Sampaloc, Manila. Conducted by Reynold Agnes, July 10.Google Scholar
  2. FGD #2. 2014. Transient Sidewalk Vendors, C.M. Recto, Manila. Conducted by Reynold Agnes, July 19.Google Scholar
  3. FGD #3. 2014. Sugarcane and Rice Farmers, Barangay Dayap, Nasugbu, Batangas. Conducted by Jan Robert Go, 26 July.Google Scholar

Interviews

  1. Academic Source #1.2014. Loreta N. Castro, Program Director of Center for Peace Program, Miriam College. E-mail correspondence with author in Quezon City, June 14.Google Scholar
  2. Academic Source #2. 2014. Rosalyn R. Echem, Director of Gender Research and Resource Center, Western Mindanao State University. E-mail correspondence with author in Zamboanga City, June 15.Google Scholar
  3. Academic Source #3. 2014. Herman Joseph S. Kraft, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman. Interview by author in Quezon City, June 4.Google Scholar
  4. Academic Source #4. 2014. Dennis Quilala, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman. Interview by author in Quezon City, May 27.Google Scholar
  5. Academic Source #5.2014. Maria Lourdes G. Rebullida, Professor of Political Science, University of the Philippines Diliman. Interview by author in Quezon City, June 6.Google Scholar
  6. Academic Source #6. 2014. Adelia Roadilla. Director of Polytechnic University of the Philippines Mulanay Campus. E-mail correspondence with author in Mulanay, May 29.Google Scholar
  7. Civil Society Source #1. 2014. A project coordinator of the Community-Based Adaptation and Resilience against Disasters Project. E-mail correspondence with author in Iloilo City, August 9.Google Scholar
  8. Civil Society Source #2. 2014. Pio Fuentes, Program Manager of Assisi Development Foundation, Inc. E-mail correspondence with author in Davao City, July 8.Google Scholar
  9. Civil Society Source #3. 2014. Joeven Reyes, Executive Director of Sulong CARHRIHL (Comprehensive Agreement on Respect for Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law). Interview by author in Quezon City, June 13.Google Scholar
  10. Government Source #1. 2014. An Official at the Foreign Service Institute, Department of Foreign Affairs. Interviewed by Author in Pasay City, June 25.Google Scholar
  11. Government Source #2. 2014. An Official at the National Security Council. Interviewed by Author in Quezon City, June 18.Google Scholar
  12. Government Source #3. 2014. Jay Carizo, Technical Consultant at the National Anti-poverty Commission. Interviewed by Author in Quezon City, July 8.Google Scholar
  13. Government Source #4. 2014. Raymund Jose Quilop, Assistant Secretary at the Department of National Defense. Interviewed by Author in Quezon City, June 9.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of the PhilippinesDiliman, Quezon CityPhilippines

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