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The Role of a Sustainable Development Approach in Reconciling the Antinomy Between Stabilization Clauses and the Host State’s Regulatory Power

  • Jola Gjuzi
Chapter

Abstract

This Chapter addresses the role of a sustainable development approach in reconciling the stabilization clause / regulatory power antinomy. To that effect, two main questions are addressed. The sustainable development approach requires establishing whether, and if so, how the concept of sustainable development can apply to the antinomy. The answer to this first question allows the elaboration of the extent to which such a concept can mitigate or reconcile the identified antinomy.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kalo & Associates Law FirmTiranaAlbania

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