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The Implications of Stabilization Clauses on the Host State’s Regulatory Power: A Sustainable Development Perspective

  • Jola Gjuzi
Chapter

Abstract

Stabilization clauses are aimed against the host state’s interference with the regulatory framework of investment projects. As such they address the foreign investor’s key concern for stability. From the host state’s perspective their implications are more complex. On the one hand, they constitute an important tool for attracting foreign direct investment (“FDI”) and thereby for advancing economic development. On the other hand, they may constitute a threat to the host state’s need for flexibility, when this latter exercises its power to regulate in the public interest. This chapter elaborates on the main effects of stabilization clauses on the host state’s regulatory power and the extent to which they limit the host state’s policy space, thereby leading to an antinomy between stabilization clauses and the host state’s regulatory power. This is made by drawing from the rationale and forms of stabilization clauses discussed in the previous chapter. The legal implications of such clauses are discussed separately in Part II (Chaps.  4 6).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jola Gjuzi
    • 1
  1. 1.Kalo & Associates Law FirmTiranaAlbania

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