Advertisement

Adding all up: Mathematical Learning Difficulties Around the World

  • Vitor Geraldi HaaseEmail author
  • Helga Krinzinger
Chapter

Abstract

The 12 chapters in this section allow us to travel around the world and figure out approaches to math learning and its difficulties. Both differences and general trends are identifiable. On the one hand, differences are huge, both cross- and intranationally. Across countries, different levels of math achievement and diverse solutions, with different degrees of success, are available. Intranational socioeconomic, cultural, linguistic, and religious diversity calls for accommodations between the need to implement a minimum curriculum and improve achievement and acknowledge diversity at the same time. On the other hand, some global trends are identifiable, such as increasing value ascribed to math education, increasing recognition of math learning difficulties as a problem, increasing state regulation of and responsibility for math education, improvement of teacher training and greater teacher autonomy, shift from a medically oriented to a pedagogically oriented model of recognition of and intervention for math learning difficulties, appreciation of customized interventions in which the students play an active role, and need to incorporate scientific evidence into educational practice. Overall, there is a remarkable converging awareness of the growing importance of mathematics in the present and future knowledge and global society. At the same time, increasing demands on math performance are expected to heighten the problems associated with diversity in math achievement and its motivational and social consequences.

Keywords

Math learning difficulties Global perspective Cross-cultural comparison PISA TIMSS International surveys of math achievement 

References

  1. Ashkenazi, S., Restle, H., & Mark-Zigdon, M. (2018). Maths learning and its difficulties in Israel. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  2. Baffaluy, M. G., & Puvuelo, M. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the eastern European countries. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: from the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  3. Balbi, A., Ruiz, C. Y., & García, P. (2017). ¿Hay diferencias en la habilidad del docente para identificar dificultades en cálculo y en lectura? Revista Neuropsicología Latinoamericana, 9(1), 47–55.Google Scholar
  4. Badian, N. A. (1983). Arithmetic and nonverbal learning. In H. R. Myklebust (Ed.), Progress in learning disabilities (Vol. 5, pp. 235–264). New York: Grune and Stratton.Google Scholar
  5. Badian, N. A. (1999). Persistent arithmetic, reading, or arithmetic and reading disability. Annals of Dyslexia, 49, 45–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Barbiero, C., Lonciari, I., Montico, M., Monasta, L., Penge, R., Vio, C., et al. (2012). National Committee on the Epidemiology of Dyslexia working group; Epidemiology of Dyslexia of Friuli Venezia Giulia working group (FVGwg). The submerged dyslexia iceberg: Hhow many school children are not diagnosed? Results from an Italian study. PLoS One, 7(10), e48082.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048082 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Batchelor, S., Gilmore, C., & Inglis, M. (2017). Parents' and children’s mathematics anxiety. In U. Xolocotzin Eligio (Ed.), Understanding emotions in mathematical thinking and learning (pp. 315–336). San Diego: Academic.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Beilock, S. L., Gunderson, E. A., Ramirez, G., & Levine, S. C. (2010). Female teachers’ math anxiety affects girls’ math achievement. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(5), 1860–1863.  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0910967107 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bekdemir, M. (2010). The pre-service teachers’ mathematics anxiety related to depth of negative experiences in mathematics classroom while they were students. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 75(3), 311–328.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10649-010-9260-7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bonawitz, E., Shafto, P., Gweon, H., Goodman, N. D., Spelke, E., & Schulz, L. (2011). The double-edged sword of pedagogy: Instruction limits spontaneous exploration and discovery. Cognition, 120, 322–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Carr, M., Hettinger Steiner, H., Kyser, B., & Biddlecomb, B. (2008). A comparison of early emerging gender differences in mathematical competency. Learning and Individual Differences, 18, 61–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Carvalho, M. R. S., & Haase, V. G. (2018). Genetics of dyscalculia 1: In search of genes. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), International handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  13. Casey, M. B., Nuttall, R. L., & Pezaris, E. (1997). Mediators of gender differences in mathematics college entrance test scores: A comparison of spatial skills with internalized beliefs and anxieties. Developmental Psychology, 33, 669–680.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Casey, M. B., Nuttall, R. N., & Pezaris, E. (2001). Spatial-mechanical reasoning skills versus mathematics self-confidence as mediators of gender differences on mathematics subtests using cross-national gender-based items. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 32, 28–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Chang, T. T., Lee, J. R., & Yen, N. S. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from Taiwan. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  16. Christodoulou, D. (2014). Seven myths about education. London: Routledge/The Curriculum Centre.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Csikos, C., András, S., Rausch, A., & Shvarts, A. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the Eastern European countries. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: from the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  18. Denissen, J. J. A., Zarrett, N. R., & Eccles, J. S. (2007). I like to do it, I'm able, and I know I am: Longitudinal couplings between domain-specific achievement, self-concept, and interest. Child Development, 78, 430–447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Desoete, A., Dowker, A., & Hasselhorn, M. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the Middle European countries. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: from the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  20. Devine, A., Soltész, F., Nobes, A., Goswami, U., & Szűcs, D. (2013). Gender differences in developmental dyscalculia depend on diagnostic criteria. Learning and Instruction, 27, 31–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Dorneles, B. V. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the Latin-American Countries. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  22. Dowker, A. (2018). Children’s mathematical difficulties: Some contributory factors and interventions. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  23. Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2013). An uncertain glory. India and its contradictions. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Else-Quest, N. M., Hyde, J. S., & Linn, M. C. (2010). Cross-national patterns of gender differences in mathematics: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 103–127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the opressed (30th Anniversary Ed.). New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
  26. Fuchs, L. S., Fuchs, D., Seethaler, P. M., & Zhu, N. (2018). Three frameworks for assessing responsiveness to instruction as a means of identifying mathematical learning frameworks disabilities. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), International handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  27. Geary, D. C., Hamson, C. O., Chen, G. P., Liu, F., Hoard, M. K., & Salthouse, T. A. (1997). Computational and reasoning abilities in arithmetic: Cross-generational change in China and the United States. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 4, 425–430.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Gersten, R., Clarke, B., & Mazzocco, M. M. M. (2007). Historical and contemporary perspectives on mathematical learning disabilities. In D. B. Berch & M. M. M. Mazzocco (Eds.), Why is math so hard for some children? The nature and origins of mathematical learning difficulties and disabilities (pp. 7–27). Baltimore: Brookes.Google Scholar
  29. Guiso, L., Monte, F., Sapienza, P., & Zingales, L. (2008). Culture, gender, and math. Science, 320, 1164–1165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Gross-Tsur, V., Manor, O., & Shalev, R. S. (1996). Developmental dyscalculia: Prevalence and demographic features. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 38, 25–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Haase, V. G., & Carvalho, M. R. S. (2018). Genetics of dyscalclia. 2: In search of endophenotypes. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), International handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  32. Haase, V. G., Guimarães, A. P. L., & Wood, G. (2018). Math & emotions: The case of math anxiety. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), International handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  33. Halpern, D. F. (1997). Sex differences in intelligence. Implications for education. American Psychologist, 52, 1091–1102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Hattie, J. C. (2009). Visible learning. A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Hausmann, R., Tyson, L. D., & Zahidi, S. (2006). The global gender gap report 2006, World Economic Forum.Google Scholar
  36. Hein, J. (2000). The specific disorder of arithmetical skills. Dissertation thesis submitted to the Charité medical school, Humboldt-University, Berlin.Google Scholar
  37. Jordan, N. C., Rinne, L., & Hansen, N. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the United States. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  38. Kaufmann, L., Nuerk, H.-C., Graf, M., Krinzinger, H., Delazer, M., & Willmes, K. (2009). TEDI-MATH. Test zur Erfassung numerisch-rechnerischer Fertigkeiten vom Kindergarten bis zur 3. Klasse. Bern: Verlag Hans Huber.Google Scholar
  39. Kimura, D. (2000). Sex and cognition. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  40. Klauer, K. J. (1992). In Mathematik mehr leistungsschwache Mädchen, im Lesen und Rechtschreiben mehr leistungsschwache Jungen? Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Pädagogische Psychologie, 26, 48–65.Google Scholar
  41. Klein, D. (2003). A brief history of American K-12 mathematics education in the 20th century. In J. M. Royer (Ed.), Mathematical cognition (pp. 175–225). Greenwitch, CO: IAP (Information Age Publisher.Google Scholar
  42. Kirschner, P. A., Sweller, J., & Clark, R. E. (2006). Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: An analysis of the failure of constructivism, discovery, problem-based, and inquiry-based teaching. Educational Psychologist, 41, 75–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Krinzinger, H. (2011). The role of multi-digit numbers in the development of numeracy. Saarbrücken: Südwestdeutscher Verlag für Hochschulschriften.Google Scholar
  44. Krinzinger, H., Kaufmann, L., Grégoire, J., Desoete, A., Nuerk, H.-C., & Willmes, K. (2012). Gender differences in the development of numerical skills. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology, 4, 63–77.Google Scholar
  45. Krinzinger, H., Wood, G., & Willmes, K. (2012). What accounts for individual and gender differences in the multi-digit number processing of primary school children? Journal of Psychology, 220, 78–79.Google Scholar
  46. Lauchlan, F., & Boyle, C. (2007). Is the use of labels in special education useful? Support for Learning, 22, 36–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Lee, J. (2009). Universals and specifics of math self-concept, math self-efficacy, and math anxiety across 41 PISA 2003 participating countries. Learning and Individual Differences, 19(3), 355–365.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2008.10.009 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Lee, H. S., & Anderson, J. R. (2013). Student learning: What has instruction got to do with it? Annual Review of Psychology, 64, 445–469.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Lewis, C., Hitch, G. J., & Walker, P. (1994). The prevalence of specific arithmetic difficulties and specific reading difficulties in 9- to 10-year-old boys and girls. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 35(2), 283–292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Lindberg, S. M., Hyde, J. S., Petersen, J. L., & Linn, M. C. (2010). New trends in gender and mathematics performance: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 1123–1135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Mayer, R. E. (2004). Should there be a three-strike rule against pure discovery learning? The case for guided methods of instruction. American Psychologist, 59(1), 14–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Mazzocco, M. M. M., Hanich, L. B., & Noeder, M. M. (2012). Primary school age students' spontaneous comments about math reveal emerging dispositions linked to later mathematics achievement. Child Development Research, 170, 310.  https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/170310 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Meece, J. L., Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J. S. (1990). Predictors of math anxiety and its influence on young adolescents' course enrollment intentions and performance in mathematics. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(1), 60–70.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.82.1.60 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Osborne, J. W. (2001). Testing stereotype threat: Does anxiety explain race and sex differences in achievement? Contemporary Educational Psychology, 26, 291–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Parsons, S., & Bynner, J. (2005). Does numeracy matter more? London: University of London, Institute of Education National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy.Google Scholar
  56. Penner, A. M. (2008). Gender differences in extreme mathematical achievement: An international perspective on biological, social, and societal factors. AJS, 114, S138–S170.Google Scholar
  57. Ramaa, S. (2018). Learning difficulties and disabilities in mathematics: Indian scenario. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  58. Räsänen, P., Daland, E., Dalvang, T., Engström, A., Korhone, J., Kristinsdóttir, J. V., et al. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from the Nordic countries. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  59. Reeve, R. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from Australia. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  60. Roberts, N., Tshuma, L., Mpalami, N., & Saka, T. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from Southern Africa. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  61. Rodríguez, C., Cuadro, A., & Ruiz, C. (2018). Mathematics learning and its difficulties: Perspectives from Chile and Uruguay. In A. Fritz-Stratmann, V. G. Haase, & P. Räsänen (Eds.), The international handbook of math learning difficulties: From the lab to the classroom. São Paulo: Springer Brazil.Google Scholar
  62. Rosas, R., & Santa Cruz, C. (2013). Dime en qué colegio estudiaste y te diré qué CI tienes: Radiografía al desigual acceso al capital cognitivo en Chile. Santiago: Ediciones UC.Google Scholar
  63. Rubinsten, O., & Henik, A. (2009). Developmental dyscalculia: Heterogeneity might not mean different mechanisms. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13, 92–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Share, D. L., Moffitt, T. E., & Silva, P. A. (1988). Factors associated with arithmetic-and-reading disability and specific arithmetic ability. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 21, 313–320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Siegler, R. S., & Braithwaite, D. W. (2017). Numerical development. Annual Review of Psychology, 68, 187–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Sowell, T. (2010). Inside American education. The decline, the deception, the dogmas. New York: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
  67. Stankov, L. (2010). Unforgiving Confucian culture: A breeding ground for high academic achievement, test anxiety and self-doubt? Learning and Individual Differences, 20(6), 555–563.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2010.05.003 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Tomasello, M., Kruger, A. C., & Ratner, H. H. (1993). Cultural learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 16, 495–552.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Tooley, J. (2001). The global education industry. Lessons from private education in developing countries. London: Institute of Economic Affairs.Google Scholar
  70. Turner, J. C., Midgley, C., Meyer, D. K., Gheen, M., Anderman, E. M., Kang, Y., & Patrick, H. (2002). The classroom environment and students’ reports of avoidance strategies in mathematics: A multimethod study. Journal of Educational Psychology, 94, 88–106.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.94.1.88 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Van Garderen, D. (2006). Spatial visualization, visual imagery, and mathematical problem solving of students with varying abilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39, 496–506.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Von Aster, M., Kucian, K., Schweiter, M., & Martin, E. (2005). Rechenstörungen im Kindesalter. Monatsschrift Kinderheilkunde, 153(7), 614–622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Weinhold Zulauf, M., Schweiter, M., & von Aster, M. G. (2003). Das Kindergartenalter: Sensitive Periode für die Entwicklung numerischer Fertigkeiten. Kindheit und Entwicklung, 12(4), 222–230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Voyer, D., Voyer, S., & Bryden, M. P. (1995). Magnitude of sex differences in spatial abilities: A meta-analysis and consideration of critical variables. Psychological Bulletin, 117, 250–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. World Bank. (2017). Um ajuste justo. Análise da eficiência e eqüidade do gasto público no Brasl. Volume 1 – Síntese. http://www.worldbank.org/pt/country/brazil/publication/brazil-expenditure-review-report
  76. Zuber, J., Pixner, S., Moeller, K., & Nuerk, H.-C. (2009). On the language specificity of basic number processing: Transcoding in a language with inversion and its relation to working memory capacity. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102, 60–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de PsicologiaFaculdade de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychologySection Child Neuropsychology, University Hospital of the RWTH AachenAachenGermany

Personalised recommendations