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Back to the Future: Emerging Technology, Social, and Cultural Trends Affecting Consumer Informatics

  • Margo Edmunds
  • Christopher Hass
  • Erin Holve
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is about the transformational ways that information and communication technologies enable people to make personal decisions about their health and health care. We will describe some key contributing influences and future implications of engaged consumers using digital technologies to improve their health and health care experiences, particularly their impact on healthcare delivery systems and treatment decisions. Throughout the chapter, we use the term digital health to refer to the technology industry that produces and uses electronic information and communications technologies and tools—such as web portals, mobile phones, sensors, and online social networks—that deliver services and help people manage their personal health and wellness. Among all of the terms describing parts of the industry—mobile health, telehealth, and connected health—we use the term consumer informatics because it describes the multidisciplinary fields that study personal needs and preferences about health information, develop evidence-based ways to tailor and personalize information, and look for ways to make information more accessible and usable across platforms and settings. Our intention is to provide a perspective that acknowledges implicit biases embedded within healthcare systems and seeks to democratize health information sharing across provider–consumer relationships.

Keywords

Consumer informatics Consumer-facing technology Health behavior change Person-centered care Patient experience User experience Human-centered design Innovation User-centered design Payment reform Value-based purchasing Visual abstract Workflow 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margo Edmunds
    • 1
  • Christopher Hass
    • 2
  • Erin Holve
    • 3
  1. 1.AcademyHealthWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.BostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Care FinanceGovernment of the District of ColumbiaWashington, DCUSA

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