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Australian Dry Stone Terraces: An Historical and Contemporary Interpretation

  • Raelene Marshall
Chapter
Part of the Environmental History book series (ENVHIS, volume 9)

Abstract

The topic of this paper will attempt to describe Australian terraced landscapes styles and their historical evolution through the prism of the range of practical, survival, cultural, social and aesthetic genres constructed from the 1800s early settlement era through to present-day contemporary designs. The story stretches from the Gold Rush times, through a creative surge after World War II, to the contemporary terraces built in the last decade or so at the Mount Annan Botanical Gardens in New South Wales. Of particular interest here is the historical background that in the 1850s and 60s Gold Rush period Swiss Italians from Ticino and Swiss immigrants from the southern part of Graubünden settled in the area around Daylesford, Victoria. Even today, their influence is ever present in the township of Hepburn Springs through the names of its residents, the names of its Mineral Springs (Locarno) and its buildings.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dry Stone Walls Association of AustraliaMelbourneAustralia

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