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Resources and Private Interests

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

It is not always about money. To achieve the goals set by member-states and those generated within international government organizations, partners often bring far more to the table than cash. While financial pressure is a constant, partnerships often succeed because of partner expertise; physical resources ranging from things as simple as fuel, to as complex as bio-metric identification software and equipment. To tap such resources the International Telecommunication Union, Interpol and the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property have innovated to get the best from their networks, which often reflect their own cultural perspectives. From reverse auctions to classrooms, Masters shines the light on how partnerships operate, and what partners bring to the table.

Keywords

Global public private partnerships ITU Interpol ICCROM 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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