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Leaders

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

Leadership sets the tone for an organization and is typically linked to the professional culture affiliated with an IGO. More often than not, the leaders of the ITU, Interpol and ICCROM are experienced telecommunication engineers, police or conservators. Masters assesses leadership from three time periods in each organizations – founding leaders; change agents; and 21st century leaders. The founders in each case spent decades at their respective helms, imprinting their organizations with strong professional links, despite the necessities of international civil service. At times of change, professional and organizational cultures influenced the interpretation and implementation of new public management (NPM). In the modern era, leaders steer their organizations through the demands of globalization, but in a way they professionally perceive as the correct course.

Keywords

International civil service New public management Professional culture Organizational culture ITU, Interpol, ICCROM 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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