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Global Public-Private Partnerships: Theoretical Perspectives

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

Masters defines global public-private partnerships, international government organizations, professional culture and organizational culture to unpack how these concepts interact in global governance. Each case organization – the International Telecommunication Union, Interpol and the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property – frame their approach to partnerships through cultural lenses, and use such perspectives to interpret the drivers of new public management (NPM) that have emerged from Anglo-American governance practices. Yet despite these powerful influences, engineering culture, police culture and conservation culture do far more to shape partnerships than do member-states.

Keywords

Global public private partnerships Interpol International Telecommunication Union International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property Professional culture Organizational culture 

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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