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Across the Public-Private Divide in the International Sphere

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

Global public-private partnerships influence our daily lives. They are part of the global governance framework – yet our understanding of them is incomplete. Past research has attributed the existence of these partnerships between state, market and civil society actors variously to the influence of leaders, new management ideas, resource deficits and the proliferation of issues beyond the ability of any single sector to manage. Yet researchers generally focus on the United Nations, and overlook the technical organizations that facilitate a multitude of policy areas between nation-states, their agencies and administrations. This chapter outlines the puzzle drawn from personal experience with such an organization – Interpol, and then briefly outlines the methods employed to analyse the influence of professional culture and organizational culture in technical organizations.

Keywords

Global governance Public-private partnership Interpol United Nations 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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