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Western Europe

  • Matthias Blum
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

A great deal of economic history has been dedicated to questions concerning Western Europe. This chapter recommends a selection of works in this genre. The second part then sets out a pathway towards writing novel contributions to the economic history of this world region. The author advocates that scholars invert the typical approach and hold the rest of the world up as a mirror through which to explain European exceptionalism.

JEL Classification

N01 N13 N14 N23 N24 N33 N34 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Blum
    • 1
  1. 1.Queen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

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