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Feminine Forms Between Recommendations and Usages

  • Federica Formato
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Language, Gender and Sexuality book series (PSLGS)

Abstract

Academia is paying attention to ‘masculine as a norm’ with the aim to unravel the intricate relation between language and a sexist and historically male-oriented society. Activists, among whom, politicians, are also raising their voices to challenge the discursive status quo of language which reproduces an imbalanced society. Feminist linguist Alma Sabatini bequeathed both academics and activists a series of leaflets containing examples of how to avoid sexism in the Italian language, written in the late 1980s. However, in investigating online commentaries and speakers’ attitudes towards gendered language, resistance in using marked feminine is still a major concern. Speakers point to several reasons for rejecting a fairer language: opposition to what is known, relevance to gender parity, and the un-aesthetic nature of these forms.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Federica Formato
    • 1
  1. 1.LancasterUK

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