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The METROPOLE Project – An Integrated Framework to Analyse Local Decision Making and Adaptive Capacity to Large-Scale Environmental Change: Decision Making and Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Santos, Brazil

  • José A. MarengoEmail author
  • Frank Muller-Karger
  • Mark Pelling
  • Catherine J. Reynolds
Chapter

Abstract

Assessment of the risks due to exposure and sensitivity of coastal communities to coastal flooding is essential for informed decision-making. Strategies for public understanding and awareness of the tangible effects of climate change are fundamental in developing policy options. A multidisciplinary, multinational team of natural and social scientists from the USA, the UK, and Brazil developed the METROPOLE Project to evaluate how local governments may decide between adaptation options associated with SLR projections. METROPOLE developed a participatory approach in which public actors engage fully in defining the research problem and evaluating outcomes.

Using a case study of the city of Santos, in the coast of the State of Sao Paulo in Southeastern Brazil, METROPOLE developed a method for evaluating risks jointly with the community, comparing ‘no-action’ to ‘adaptation’ scenarios. At the core of the analysis are estimates of economic costs of the impact of floods on urban real estate under SLR projections through 2050 and 2100. Results helped identify broad preferences and orientations in adaptation planning, which the community, including the Santos municipal government, co-developed in a joint effort with natural and social scientists.

Keywords

Sea-level rise Adaptation options Adaptive capacity Participatory approach Santos METROPOLE project 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • José A. Marengo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Frank Muller-Karger
    • 2
  • Mark Pelling
    • 3
  • Catherine J. Reynolds
    • 4
  1. 1.National Center for Monitoring and Early Warning of Natural Disasters (CEMADEN)São José dos CamposBrazil
  2. 2.Institute for Marine Remote Sensing/IMaRS, College of Marine ScienceUniversity of South FloridaSt. PetersburgUSA
  3. 3.Department of GeographyKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.International Ocean Institute, College of Marine ScienceUniversity of South FloridaSt. PetersburgUSA

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