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How Healthy Ageing Can Foster Age-Friendly Environment?

  • Suzanne GaronEmail author
  • Mario Paris
Chapter
Part of the Practical Issues in Geriatrics book series (PIG)

Abstract

This chapter proposes a reflection on the concept of healthy ageing in three different ways: (1) a historical perspective that takes into account different meanings of this concept during the last decades and how it has been related to the active ageing; (2) the new variant of healthy ageing proposed by the WHO in the World Report on Ageing and Health (WRAH), specifically the functional ability that needs to be taken into consideration as a broad concept that encompasses both built and social environments. These are key components to maintain or improve the quality of the health of an ageing person; (3) the importance of the environments in a policy of ageing by providing an example of the development of the Age-Friendly Cities and Communities programme in Québec, Canada.

Keywords

Healthy ageing Active ageing Age-friendly environments Functional ability Quebec’s age-friendly cities and communities programme 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work, Université de SherbrookeQuebecCanada
  2. 2.Research Center on Aging—CIUSSS de l’Estrie—CHUSSherbrookeCanada
  3. 3.School of Social Work, Université de MonctonMonctonCanada

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