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A Quarrel of Poisons: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Homeopathic Poisoner

  • Sara L. Crosby
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine book series (PLSM)

Abstract

Crosby examines the most important agent in the poisonous woman’s feminist/medical reframing—Harriet Beecher Stowe and her creation, Cassy. Scholars have typically considered Stowe’s domesticity as central to her work, but Crosby uncovers how Stowe’s other vocation as a lay homeopathic physician enabled her transition into an activist author. The chapter details how a homeopathic theory of poison helped Stowe reconceptualize the female poisoner as medicinal and how she thus made her heroic, doctoring poisoner Cassy a model for women’s critical and politically efficacious interventions in the public sphere.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara L. Crosby
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State University at MarionMarionUSA

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