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Defining Truthfulness, Deception, and Related Concepts

  • Pamela J. KalbfleischEmail author
  • Tony Docan-Morgan
Chapter

Abstract

What constitutes truthfulness and deception in everyday human interaction is not a simple, straightforward phenomenon. In the current chapter, we provide readers with a concise understanding of truthfulness, deception, and related concepts. We also raise important questions about the competing desires humans have regarding truthful and deceptive communication, various gray areas where the nature of truth and deception are blurred, and the ethics of potentially deceptive messages.

Keywords

Truthfulness Deception Definitions Ethics Gray areas Magicians Reality television Con artists Strategic communication Advertising Healthcare 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CommunicationUniversity of North DakotaGrand ForksUSA
  2. 2.Department of Communication StudiesUniversity of Wisconsin-La CrosseLa CrosseUSA

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