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Legitimacy pp 235-257 | Cite as

Citizenship and Legitimacy: Kolkata’s Anglo-Indian Experiences

  • Robyn AndrewsEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Urban Anthropology book series (PSUA)

Abstract

Anglo-Indians are a mixed descent minority community, originating from European colonial groups making their home in India, with Britain being the most influential. From the earliest days, most Anglo-Indians enacted their identification with Britain through language, dress, food and religion, which differentiated them from other groups in India. Post Indian Independence (1947), Anglo-Indians achieved Constitutional rights, including political representation, employment ‘quotas’ and support for their schools. India has a history of inclusivity, bolstered by a unique take on secularity. Anglo-Indians are, however, increasingly concerned about the current trend towards Hindu Nationalism. Andrews looks ethnographically at the impact of these factors and at the strategies Anglo-Indians use to negotiate a legitimate place in the nation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Massey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

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