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Policy Mixes for Sustained Ecosystem Service Provision

  • Irene RingEmail author
  • Christoph Schröter-Schlaack
Chapter

Abstract

Policies and, more specifically, policy instruments to achieve certain policy objectives, are important means to govern and manage ecosystem service risks and are thus a main class of societal responses to ecosystem service risks. When focusing on ecosystem services and associated risks, it is essential to keep in mind biodiversity and ecosystem service governance. Due to the manifold synergies and potential trade-offs between biodiversity and ecosystem services, as well as those among different ecosystem services, such governance arrangements usually involve several policies and policy instruments, so-called policy mixes.

Keywords

Policy instruments Policy mix Policy evaluation Biodiversity conservation Ecosystem service risks 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Institute (IHI) ZittauTechnische Universität DresdenZittauGermany
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZLeipzigGermany

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