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Conclusions

  • Alfonso Díez-Minguela
  • Julio Martinez-Galarraga
  • Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

The electoral victories of Donald Trump in the US and the advocates of Brexit in the UK are not just a reflection of a growing economic inequality and social polarization. They also show definite spatial patterns. These political responses on the part of the electorate are linked to factors of various types. From an economic perspective they can be seen both as a defence of class interests stemming from a perception of increased inequality in personal income and as a reaction to changes in the relative wealth of territories.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfonso Díez-Minguela
    • 1
  • Julio Martinez-Galarraga
    • 1
  • Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ValènciaValènciaSpain

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