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Ergonomics in Hospital: Prevention of Interruptions and Safety in Drug Administration

  • Gabriele Frangioni
  • Klaus P. Biermann
  • Barbara Caposciutti
  • Salvatore De Masi
  • Mario Di Pede
  • Silvia Prunecchi
  • Angela Savelli
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 818)

Abstract

The lack of signal elements between Healthcare Workers and users can generate errors caused by interruptions during drug administration depending on human, technical or environmental factors that can become a source of stress and adverse events.

Aim of the project is the identification and application of tools for the prevention of interruption that promote the safety of drug administration.

The project is organized in several steps: process mapping; testing; operators training; implementation; monitoring.

The testing observed a 44% reduction of interruption. The introduction of information sheets for families in hospital rooms has contributed to reduce by 28% the interruptions.

The establishment of a “No Interruption Group” had allowed an appropriate training and an organizational and management support to healthcare workers involved.

The active involvement of physicians and nurses revealed critical issues, such as behavioral, organizational and structural ones, and the subsequent improvement actions.

Keywords

Interruptions Drug Administration Safety Healthcare design 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriele Frangioni
    • 1
  • Klaus P. Biermann
    • 1
  • Barbara Caposciutti
    • 1
  • Salvatore De Masi
    • 1
  • Mario Di Pede
    • 1
  • Silvia Prunecchi
    • 1
  • Angela Savelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Meyer Children’s University HospitalFlorenceItaly

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